How many stories have you ever imagined for a city. Thessaloniki has so many stories to tell us. And a heart made of such stories. The heart of the stories of the city...

This is an official submission for the 2016 Apps4Thessaloniki competition - Tourism edition.

Enjoy!

Thessaloniki is a city full of stories that have been unfolding over 2300 years. They are the stories of her people, of her visitors, of her friends.

Thessaloniki has many stories to tell us.

Add your story too and contribute to the heart-mosaic, made up of pebbles; The heart of the stories of the city!

While much of Greece struggles to attract tourists in difficult economic times, the country's second city Thessaloniki is enjoying a renewed interest.

Rajan Datar discovered that many were attracted to the city for its slower pace, history and culture and a new campaign for more visitors was being targeted at those on cruises, younger people and lesbian and gay tourists.

A beautiful city with much ancient history, churches and monuments like The wight tower, Rotonda, Kamara, Agia Sofia, Agios Dimitrios and more.

Here is a very nice presentation of the city made by a local. Enjoy!

Jews played an important role in Thessaloniki and many parts of the city do have the memories written on them

Nowadays the visitor can visit Jewish Museum of Thessaloniki, the Holocaust Memorial and one of the city’s two historic synagogues, Monastiriotes' Synagogue or "Yad Lezikaron" Synagogue.

Here is the code of this project stored on Github.

GitHub is a Web-based Git repository hosting service. It offers all of the distributed revision control and source code management (SCM) functionality of Git as well as adding its own features.

So this is technical but if you know this is the place to contribute to this project.

Thessaloniki itself never doubted its own cultural identity and its millennia of existence, it stands there since 315BC. No wonder it was chosen as the co-reigning city of the Byzantine Empire alongside Constantinople – to prove just that there are several Paleochristian monuments, constituting a Unesco World Heritage Site.

Thessaloniki’s sparkling harbor is almost empty - a good thing. It remains one of the last urban seafronts in southern Europe not hemmed in by a giant marina. Instead, wooden caïques still ply the quiet bay while footpaths trace the meandering waterfront of Greece’s second largest city, some 320 miles north - and a world away - from chaotic Athens.

Read more at the National Geographic article.

The historical profile of Thessaloniki, which began in the Hellenistic era and has continued uninterrupted to the present day, is mainly linked to its Byzantine life. The walled city and its monuments can reasonably be called an open Byzantine Museum. All city monuments, Byzantine, Post – Byzantine and Ottoman – have been declared as historical landmark monuments.

Take a tour of Rotunda of Thessaloniki in Thessaloniki.

The Rotunda is an important historical site in the city which has served multiple purposes including a church and mosque. The then Emperor of Rome ordered the construction of this large domed building in the year 306. Though the original intention of this structure is ambiguous, its first known use was as a Christian church.

Nowadays, the historic capital -by right- of Macedonia,the land of Alexander the Great, has evolved into a modern and particularly charming metropolis.
A multitide of monuments and cultural assets and the town’s traditional always exist in harmony with the modern aspects and the high standard infrastructure.
Get the official paper guide and exlpore Thessaloniki.

The Church of Saint Demetrius, or Hagios Demetrios in Greek, is the main sanctuary dedicated to Saint Demetrius, the patron saint of Thessaloniki (in Central Macedonia, Greece), dating from a time when it was the second largest city of the Byzantine Empire.
It is part of the site Paleochristian and Byzantine Monuments of Thessaloniki on the list of World Heritage Sites by UNESCO since 1988.Paleochristian

Although alive to the many moments of genuine cross-confessional pollination in this excellent 500-year history of Salonica, Mark Mazower is equally careful not to neglect the more unsentimental truths. The method is well-suited to his subject, as there is unquestionably a dark and tragic arc to the city’s history.