How many stories have you ever imagined for a city. Thessaloniki has so many stories to tell us. And a heart made of such stories. The heart of the stories of the city...

This is an official submission for the 2016 Apps4Thessaloniki competition - Tourism edition.

Enjoy!

Thessaloniki is a city full of stories that have been unfolding over 2300 years. They are the stories of her people, of her visitors, of her friends.

Thessaloniki has many stories to tell us.

Add your story too and contribute to the heart-mosaic, made up of pebbles; The heart of the stories of the city!

While much of Greece struggles to attract tourists in difficult economic times, the country's second city Thessaloniki is enjoying a renewed interest.

Rajan Datar discovered that many were attracted to the city for its slower pace, history and culture and a new campaign for more visitors was being targeted at those on cruises, younger people and lesbian and gay tourists.

Greek summer would not be summer without the frappe, and here in Thessaloniki where it was "invented" we should probably put it on the city's coat of arms.

People are asking about frappe on Quora!

But why not come to Thessaloniki and drink as much ice coffee as you prefer?

Here is the code of this project stored on Github.

GitHub is a Web-based Git repository hosting service. It offers all of the distributed revision control and source code management (SCM) functionality of Git as well as adding its own features.

So this is technical but if you know this is the place to contribute to this project.

Here are some key phrases you have to know in order to familiarize yourself with the city. If you forget them don't worry we have a cheat-sheet for you!

- Frappe (iced coffee drink, friends and relax)
- Chalara (Relax, take it easy)
- Ti me les (What are you talking to me)
- Tsoureki (our traditional cake)
- Hey Kardasi (A way to say: "yo bro!")
- Bougatsa (our traditional pie)

If you come after a crazy night in Thessaloniki you should know there is an old habbit: eating patsas on a historic restaurant.

Patsas is basically a soup from pork leg and pork belly, the parts of the pork that very few want to eat.

But it is a medicine for your stomach after you get drunk!

Thessaloniki’s sparkling harbor is almost empty - a good thing. It remains one of the last urban seafronts in southern Europe not hemmed in by a giant marina. Instead, wooden caïques still ply the quiet bay while footpaths trace the meandering waterfront of Greece’s second largest city, some 320 miles north - and a world away - from chaotic Athens.

Read more at the National Geographic article.

They say that Thessaloniki is the city of coffee. They mean that almost everywhere you can find a cafe bar or another shop offering coffee.

While this may be true taking a coffee (or your favorite drink) with friends is something you can do very easily in Thessaloniki. And it is very rare to find a cafe bar without customers!

Thessaloniki Food Festival is an event organized by the Municipality of Thessaloniki. It's main focus is to promote the local gastronomy and cousine as also as to establish Thessaloniki as a great option for gastronomy related tourism.

If you come to Thessaloniki do not forget to join the events. They are so 'delicious'!

Nowadays, the historic capital -by right- of Macedonia,the land of Alexander the Great, has evolved into a modern and particularly charming metropolis.
A multitide of monuments and cultural assets and the town’s traditional always exist in harmony with the modern aspects and the high standard infrastructure.
Get the official paper guide and exlpore Thessaloniki.

Thessaloniki’s cuisine is widely known for its quality and variety. As the formation of the overall culture of the city came under many influences, Thessaloniki’s cuisine is one of the richest in Greece. Traditional recipes as well as modern trends have created a wide range of choices.

Eating out in Thessaloniki or how Greece’s culinary capital is reinventing itself.
It is Greece’s second city but its gastronomic capital – and its bars and restaurants refuse to let tough times spoil a good night out. Just one reason it makes a great city-break alternative to Athens now.

The Thessalonians were never going to let a financial crisis get in the way of a good time!